5 Tips: When You Meet a Seeing Eye® Dog Team

This goes for all Dog Guide teams no matter from what school they come.

5 Tips: When You Meet a Seeing Eye® Dog Team
Always remember, distracting a Seeing Eye dog can make its owner vulnerable to harm.
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1. Please don’t let your pet near a guide dog, even if your pet is leashed. Even allowing your pet to visit or “say hi”, for just a moment can cause the
guide dog to lose focus on the important job he has to do
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2. It’s helpful to let a person who is blind know that you are nearby and tell them if you have a dog with you.
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3. Do not call the dog’s name, make eye contact, feed or talk to the dog. It’s always best to treat the dog as if he is not there
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4. Do not pet a guide dog when he is wearing the harness. If the dog is resting without his harness, ask the owner before you pet the dog and respect the
person’s decision if they say no
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5. Do not shout directions, take the person by the arm or interrupt them when they are crossing the street. If you are concerned for their safety, ask
them if they need help first
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Legal Notes THE SEEING EYE® and SEEING EYE® are registered trademarks of The
Seeing Eye, Inc.See: http://www.SeeingEye.org

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12 Responses to 5 Tips: When You Meet a Seeing Eye® Dog Team

  1. Important tips, Patty. Happy Fourth of July hugs!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Patty says:

      Yes.

      Very important.

      Yesterday when I was walking into my local grocery store it was extremely crowded.

      There were lots of sales and this meant that there were more people and displays than usual.

      When I started through the entry way three people began speaking to Campbell and one person who had children did nothing to stop their children from running up and surrounding us.

      This immediately distracted my Campbell and we nearly knocked down a huge display in the process.

      Luckily for me I was double handing.

      This means that not only was I holding his harness handle and leash in my left hand in the working position but that I had the slack of the leash in my other hand thus giving myself more control.

      I was able to quickly get Campbell back on task.

      But.

      When I politely asked the person with the kids to move her children back from us she got offended and said I was rude.

      I did not answer her because what I wanted to say to her was not appropriate for children.

      Like

  2. Pingback: *Press it* 5 Tips: When You Meet a Seeing Eye® Dog Team #42 | Its good to be crazy Sometimes

  3. manyofus1980 says:

    Reblogged this on Therapy Bits and commented:
    Great tips here, please read them and be mindful the next time you see a guide dog out with their owner…

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Patty says:

    Thanks again for reblogging.

    Like

  5. Reblogged this on PTSD – Accepting, Coping, Thriving and commented:
    Hi All, My friend’s blog reposted this very important tips for being around helper dogs. This applies to PTSD dogs too. Please, let the owner be aware you are there and follow instructions on how to treat the dog. These are working dogs with a very important task and distractions can cause discomfort for both the dog and their human.

    Like

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